Communicating IELTS Averages with Maps - Part II

Communicating IELTS Averages with Maps - Part II

The previous post focused on collecting the data needed to make custom maps. This post will make use of that data to create maps like the one above as well as some others. While it isn’t necessary to read the previous post, it is recommended. Step 1: Load the Libraries and the Data Now, if you want to review, you can follow all the steps in the previous post. If not,you can read in the data by following the steps below.
Communicating IELTS Averages with Maps - Part I

Communicating IELTS Averages with Maps - Part I

Maps are great for visualizing dry data. In this series of posts, I’ll demonstrate how to scrape websites in order to turn this: into this: Today, I want to focus on scraping the requisite data for making the map above. Now I could just highlight the table, and then copy and paste it into a spreadsheet, but for really big tables that are spread over multiple pages, we’re going to want to do something that is more reproducible.
Coloring Under the Lines in ggplot

Coloring Under the Lines in ggplot

I am tasked with explaining incredibly complex things to people who do not have a lot of time. Consequently, using visuals has been a life saver. One day I was visiting a school explaining the Common Eurpoean Framework of Reference for Languages, which, in a nutshell, describes what language learners can do at different levels of proficiency AND the number of hours it takes for them to progress to each level.